How the Lion Learned to Moonwalk

How the Lion Learned to Moonwalk
And Other Stories on How to Design for Classical Music Experiences


Download the book: medium size (21.6 MB), small size (9.4 MB), or large size (92.4 MB). Also available from Malmö University Electronic Publishing (MUEP) at http://hdl.handle.net/2043/18116. An embeddable version is available on Issuu.


HOW-THE-LION-COVERLive classical music is facing considerable challenges. How can philharmonic orchestras, organizations that are heavily rooted in the past, become more democratic and better connected to the societies they are situated in?

Through collaboration across institutional borders and knowledge domains, the Designing Classical Music Experiences project had the ambition to develop new spatial and mediated audience experiences, and to reach new audiences in the Øresund Region. The vision was nothing less than to democratize classical music. One of the premises of the project was to involve musicians, designers, researchers, students, audience members – and many others – in the design- and development processes. Another premise was to enhance and extend the concert experience through visualizations and other types of visual arts.

A number of conclusions related to ‘organizational challenges’, ‘audience engagement’, and ‘media and technologies’ are presented and further developed in the book How the Lion Learned to Moonwalk And Other Stories on How to Design for Classical Music Experiences (see Introduction for these conclusions). The first section of the book accounts for two perspectives on how to work with live classical music and audiences from a designer’s point of view. The second section of the book give detailed accounts of the most high-profiled case studies the project has worked with.


Download the book: medium size (21.6 MB), small size (9.4 MB), or large size (92.4 MB), or view plain-text versions of individual chapters by following the links below.


Table of Contents

1. Introduction
The introduction summarizes the outcome of the project through a number of conclusions, which are suggestions how one may think and act when designing for classical music experiences, and when creating new formats and relationships.

2. Weaving Audience Engagement: Classical Music, Design, and Democracy
This chapter, written by Erling Björgvinsson, tells a story of the complexities you face when working with audience engagement: How the institutions, the arts, the audiences, the media, and our societies are intertwined in one another, and what this implies.

3. Creating Visual Design and Meaningful Audience Experiences
This chapter, written by Jakob I. Wille and Arthur M. Steijn, shares insights about how to work with new and meaningful audience experiences by utilizing technologies and visual arts.

4. Teddy in Space: Children Co-creating a Classical Music Experience
Teddy in Space looks into how children – through a symphonic sequencer – may ’recompose’ one of the pieces played at a Malmö Symphony Orchestra family concert.

5. Shadow Play: Children Co-creating Scenography
Shadow Play explores how children are involved in co-creating a scenography by adding ’shadow figures’ after having listened to classical music. The ’shadows’ are then used in a video-projected scenography, created by design students, at a Royal Danish Theatre family concert.

6. The World Orchestra: Online, Offline, and On-site
Chapter 6 describes how Copenhagen Phil’s World Online Orchestra invites online audiences to interactively explore the inner workings of an excerpt of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 by combining different parts of the orchestra.

7. Joystick: Co-creation with a Gaming Community
Joystick investigates how a game-music concert format – run by Malmö Symphony Orchestra – can work closer to a gaming community on planning, communicating, and running the event.

8. A Concert with Striking Force: Leave Your Mark on the Music
Chapter 8, the Musik2Go percussion concert (run by the Royal Danish Theatre), describes how bodily sounds and movements through interactive installations and visuals may complement and enhance a concert experience.

9. Lots of Brass, Lots of Colors
Chapter 9, the Musik2Go brass concert (run by the Royal Danish Theatre), describes foyer installations that explore how colors and music might be related, and how—during the live concert—the members of the audience can influence the visual expression.

10. Opus Lux: An Experiment with Audience Participation at Classical Concerts
Opus Lux explores how concertgoers can express emotions through a collaborative feedback tool, which enables the audience to be part of creating a collective light installation.

11. Epilogue: Together we know and can do more than alone

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Orkestern lär andra att samarbeta

Hur medlemmarna i en orkester samarbetar kan vara lärorikt att uppleva för andra typer av organisationer. Därför erbjuder nu Copenhagen Phil kurser för näringslivet där man med hjälp av orkester illustrerar begrepp som att hitta “kammartonen” och att samarbeta mellan olika personligheter.

I den inbäddade videon (eller här på YouTube) kan du se hur ett liknande möte mellan orkestern och näringslivet kan gå till. Under videon skriver Copenhagen Phils musikchef några ord om vilket värde detta kan ge åt orkestern.

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